Publications

These publications have been written and contributed by OMAH’s History Committee.  The committee publishes an article every two weeks in the “Muse News” which goes out to OMAH members. If you would like to see more content like this, become a member to receive one of the committee’s fascinating articles with your newsletter every two weeks. If you would like to get involved with the committee, reach out to the History Programming Coordinator.

History of the ORILLIA CITIZENS BAND

History of the ORILLIA CITIZENS BAND

Written & researched by Trish Crowe-Grande, History Committee Chair and Cliff Whitfield, Guest ContributorIn the late 1800s, it was common to gather at Orillia’s Civic Park (now Couchiching Beach Park) and listen to the Orillia Citizens Band, where hundreds of...

Solving the Peter Street Cemetery Mystery

Solving the Peter Street Cemetery Mystery

Who owned the Peter Street South cemetery? Your first thoughts might be that this was the St. James’ Church Cemetery, but that cemetery was about two blocks further north on the southeast corner of Peter Street and Coldwater Road. On June 19, 1873, the following...

Another Waterfront Transformation

Another Waterfront Transformation

By David Town, Historian, Author of ‘A Waterfront for Everyone’ Orillia Museum of Art & History Guest ContributorWhat a transformation our waterfront is undergoing!  There’s a new road going in with better access to the downtown, massive new sewers lie sprawled...

Harriett Todd – Orillia’s Forgotten Hero

Harriett Todd – Orillia’s Forgotten Hero

By David Town, Historian and Guest ContributorHarriett Todd, image provided by David TownFew people have had a greater influence on Orillia than Harriett Todd.  Most of us only recognize her name because a school has been named after her in Orillia, but 100 years ago...

Great Grandparents Immigration to Canada

Great Grandparents Immigration to Canada

By Janet Houston, OMAH History CommitteeAlfred and Jane HuckerWhat could tempt a middle-aged couple to emigrate from England to a distant part of the Empire in 1912? Fifty years of age is not now considered old as it was thought then. Nonetheless, this adventurous...

The Hallen Family’s Arrival in Orillia

The Hallen Family’s Arrival in Orillia

By Fred Blair, OMAH Family researcher and guest contributerEleanora’s Diary, November 4, 1833 “In the morning, before we went out of the steam vessel, George put his fish [line] in as he saw a good number of fish.  He caught nine very soon, but he had not time to...

All About the O’Brien Family,  Founders of Shanty Bay

All About the O’Brien Family, Founders of Shanty Bay

By Trish Crowe-Grande, OMAH History Committee ChairLucius Richard O’Brien portrait undated M.O. Hammond Collection: National Gallery of Canada ArchivesEdward and Mary O’Brien At the age of fourteen, Edward George O’Brien entered the naval service as a mid-shipman, but...

Mayor William Sword Frost

Mayor William Sword Frost

By History Committee members Bruce McRae and Mary Ann Grant Recently, our own City of Orillia was featured on the popular game show Jeopardy. What could we have done to garner such attention?CLUE: IN 1912 ORILLIA, ONTARIO WAS ONE OF THE FIRST TOWNS TO TRY THIS CHANGE....

A Tribute to Jean Sarjeant

A Tribute to Jean Sarjeant

by Mary Ann Grant, OMAH History CommitteeCredit - Special to the Orillia Packet and Times - Kate Grigg Jan 12, 2017 “Dad's Diary includes tales worth telling"The Orillia Museum of Art & History (OMAH) believes that it is important to acknowledge its supporters,...

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Land Acknowledgement

The Orillia Museum of Art & History is located on the traditional territory of the Anishnaabeg. The Anishinaabeg include the Ojibwe, Odawa, and Pottawatomi nations, collectively known as the Three Fires Confederacy. We respect and observe the long and enduring presence of Indigenous Peoples – First Nations, Metis and Inuit – on this land. Their teachings and stewardship, culture and way of life have shaped our City’s unique identity.

In acknowledging that we occupy colonized Indigenous territories, and out of respect for the rights of Indigenous people, we accept our collective responsibility to recognize our colonial histories as well as their present-day manifestations in order to honour, protect, and sustain this land.